Archived ESA Resolutions

A resolution is a formal statement of a decision or opinion put before or adopted by the Society. Historically, ESA's resolutions were submitted, evaluated, and disseminated during the ESA Annual Meeting through an annual presidential committee, the Resolutions Committee.

2006 Resolutions

Passed unanimously at the final business meeting of the Entomological Society of America, Indianapolis, Indiana, December 13, 2006.

Resolutions Committee: Kristopher L. Giles (Chair)
 

  1. WHEREAS, the meeting arrangements, facilities, and services associated with the 2006 Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America have been outstanding, and
    WHEREAS, the management and staff of the Indiana Convention Center and RCA Dome, the Crowne Plaza Hotel, the Hyatt Regency Hotel, the Westin Indianapolis Hotel, and Downtown Indianapolis have provided exceptional and courteous service;
    THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Entomological Society of America extends its sincere thanks to these organizations for their contribution to the success of the meeting.
  2. WHEREAS, the meeting arrangements associated with the 2006 Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America have been outstanding, and
    WHEREAS Ellen Bergfeld, Keith Schlesinger and Stacey Phelps of Tri-Societies have provided exemplary support;
    THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Entomological Society of America extends its sincere thanks and gratitude to Tri-Societies and to these individuals for their contributions to the success of the meeting.
  3. WHEREAS, the members of the Entomological Society of America who have departed during the year, and whose names were read during the opening plenary session, made immeasurable contributions in support of entomology, and
    WHEREAS, the Entomological Society of America wishes to acknowledge our loss, and demonstrate our appreciation and recognition of the many accomplishments of our departed members;
    THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Entomological Society of America recognizes and commends the lifetime achievements of our honored associates.
  4. WHEREAS, the scientific program for the 2006 Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America has been stimulating, informative, and varied, and
    WHEREAS, the task of assembling this outstanding program represents the combined hard work of a number of individuals;
    THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Program Committee, under the leadership of Co-Chairs Phil Mulder and Tom Royer, the Section Officers, the 2005 and 2007 Program Chairs, and the Student Liaison to the Program Committee are congratulated and commended for their successful effort.
  5. WHEREAS, the local arrangements for the 2006 Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America have been outstanding,
    THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Local Arrangements Committee, under the leadership of Bonnie Pendleton and Jerry Michels, be thanked for their diligent efforts and exemplary contribution to the success of the meeting;
    BE IT ALSO RESOLVED that the Society recognizes and appreciates the hard work and dedication of the Technology Committee under the leadership of Grayson Brown.
  6. WHEREAS, the 2006 Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America would not have been a success without the support of the sustaining associates, exhibitors and other commercial sponsors;
    THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Entomological Society of America expresses its sincere appreciation and thanks for their support.
  7. WHEREAS, the many functions of the Entomological Society of America would not be carried out if it were not for the efforts of many member and student volunteers;
    THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that these members and students, at the end of their volunteer service, be thanked for their hard work, dedication, and contributions to the Society.
  8. WHEREAS, the presidency of Frank E. Gilstrap has been marked by dedication, resolve, professionalism and vision towards the current state and future of the Society,
    THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Entomological Society of America extends its thanks to President Gilstrap for a job well done.

Section-C Resolution:  USDA-APHIS Database on Biological Control Permits

  1. WHEREAS, APHIS keeps a biological control permit database, but does not publish it for general use, and
    WHEREAS, this database is the only record of permits, needed as a historical record, and for future permit applications;
    THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED APHIS restores and makes available on the web the historical biological control permit database.

2005 Resolutions

Passed unanimously at the summer meeting of the Entomological Society of America Governing Board, Beltsville, Maryland, May 12-14, 2005

1.    Whereas the ESA has greatly benefited from the energy, creativity, and commitment of the members of the Standing Committee on Membership; and
Whereas the ESA greatly values their innovative proposals to expand and retain our Societal membership;
Therefore, be it resolved that the 2005 Governing Board compliments the Committee on Membership on an exemplary job in working with the Governing Board liaison and Membership and Marketing Department.

2.    WHEREAS Dr. Scott H. Hutchins has provided exemplary leadership and devotion to the ESA in working on the Society's restructuring plan;
Therefore, be it resolved that ESA expresses its gratitude to Dr. Hutchins for his work. 

Passed unanimously at the final business meeting of the Entomological Society of America, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, December 18, 2005

1.    WHEREAS, the presidency of Michael A. Ivie has been marked by historical reverence, innovative thinking, and courage,
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Entomological Society of America extends its thanks to President Ivie for a job well done.

2.    WHEREAS, many functions of the Entomological Society of America would not be carried out if it were not for the efforts of many member volunteers,
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the following members, at the end of their terms of volunteer service, be thanked for their hard work, dedication, and contributions to the Society.

Governing Board
Dr. Laurence D. Charlet, North Central Branch Representative, 2005
Dr. Jacqueline Y. Miller, Section A, Representative, 2003-2005
Dr. Elizabeth F. Beckemeyer, Section E Representative, 2003-2005

Certification Board
Dr. Stuart E. Mitchell, BCE, Director-Elect, 2005
Dr. L. Von Kaster, BCE, North Central Branch Representative, 2003-2005

Publications Council
Dr. Guy J. Hallman, Chair, 2005, and Section E Representative, 2003-2005
Dr. Barry M. O’Connor, Section A Representative, 1999-2005

Section Chairs
Brian M. Wiegmann, Section A, 2005
Dr. Catherine Loudon, Section B, 2005
Dr. Robert L. Meagher, Section C, 2005
Dr. Nancy C. Hinkle, Section D, 2005
Dr. Phillip E. Sloderbeck, BCE, Section E, 2005
Dr. James A. Reinert, Section F, 2005

American Entomologist
Dr. Rick L. Brandenburg, BCE, Chair, Editorial Board, 2005, and Section E Representative, 2001-2005

Annals of the ESA
Dr. Robert K. Vander-Meer, Chair, 2005
Dr. John W. Brown, Subject Editor, 2002-2005
Dr. David S. Haymer, Subject Editor, 2002-2005
Dr. Todd E. Shelly, Subject Editor, 2002-2005
Jennifer S. Thaler, Subject Editor, 2002-2005

Arthropod Management Tests
Dr. Raymond A. Cloyd, Chair, Editorial Board, 2005, and Section E Representative, 2001-2005

Book and Media Reviews
Dr. Abelardo C. Moncayo, Editor, 2000-2004
Dr. Jason R. Cryan, Chair, Editorial Board, 2005

Environmental Entomology
Dr. Richard A. Weinzierl, Chair, Editorial Board, 2005, and Section E Representative, 2001-2005
Dr. Peter C. Ellsworth, Subject Editor, 2002-2005
Dr. David W. Onstad, Subject Editor, 2002-2004

Journal of Economic Entomology
Dr. Richard W. Mankin, Chair, Editorial Board, 2005, and Section B Representative, 2001-2005
Dr. Michael E. Irwin, Subject Editor, 2002-2004
Gail E. Kampmeier, Subject Editor, 2002-2005
Dr. David J. Schuster, Subject Editor, 2002-2004
Nikolai A.M. Van Beek, Subject Editor, 2002-2005
Dr. Robert C. Venette, Subject Editor, 2002-2005

Journal of Medical Entomology
Dr. John D. Edman, Editor-in-Chief, 2002-2005
Dr. Gregory C. Lanzaro, Chair, Editorial Board, 2005, and Section D Representative, 2001-2005
Dr. Charles S. Apperson, Subject Editor, 2002-2005
Dr. Jan E. Conn, Subject Editor, 2002-2004

Committee on Awards
Dr. Donald C. Weber, Chair, 2005
Dr. Alton “Stormy” N. Sparks, Jr., Chair, 2002, 2004, and Southeastern Branch Representative, 2000-2005
Scott A. Russell, Southwestern Branch Representative, 2003-2005

Committee on the Common Names of Insects
Dr. Wayne K. Gall, Chair, 2005, and Member, 2003-2005
Eric H. LaGasa, Member, 2003-2005
James F. Stimmel, Member, 2003-2005

Committee on Education and Youth
Dr. Tiffany M. Heng-Moss, Chair, 2005
Dr. Daniel K. Young, North Central Branch Representative, 2003-2005
Dr. Sujaya Rao, Pacific Branch Representative, 2003-2005
Dr. James F. Price, Southeastern Branch Representative, 2003-2005
Dr. M.O. Way, Southwestern Branch Representative, 2003-2005
Dr. William W. Hoback, Section F Representative, 2003-2005

Committee on Ethics
Dr. Christopher Sansone, Chair, 2005, and Section E Representative, 2003-2005
Dr. Catherine E. Eastman, Section C Representative, 2003-2005

Committee on Fellows
Dr. Nick C. Toscano, Chair, 2005, and Pacific Branch Representative, 2003-2005
Dr. Robert R. Granados, Section C Representative, 2003-2005
Dr. John G. Thomas, Section E Representative, 2003-2005

Committee on Finance
Dr. Catharine Mannion, Member, 2003-2005

Committee on the Founders’ Memorial Award
Dr. May R. Berenbaum, Section C Representative, 2003-2005
Dr. Robert K. Peterson, Section F Representative, 2003-2005

Committee on Honorary Membership
Dr. Christian Y. Oseto, Chair, 2004, and Member, 2000-2005

Committee on International Affairs
Dr. Kenneth A. Sorensen, Chair, 2005, and Representative for the Western Hemisphere, 2003-2005
Dr. Mustapha Debboun, BCE, Representative for Africa and the Middle East, 2003-2005
Dr. Gary L. Bernon, Representative for Africa and the Middle East, 2003-2005
Dr. Florence V. Dunkel, Representative for Asia, 2003-2005
Dr. John W. Armstrong, Representative for Australia, 2003-2005

Committee on Membership
Dr. Rayda K. Krell, Chair, 2005
Dr. David G. Riley, At Large Member, 2003-2005
Dr. John L. Petersen, At Large Member, 2003-2005
Susan T. Ratcliffe, North Central Branch Representative, 2003-2005
Dr. Jerome F. Grant, Southeastern Branch Representative, 2003-2005

Committee on Rules
Dr. John J. Brown, Chair, 2005, and Member, 2001-2005
John Fajardo, Student Liaison, 2004-2005

Committee on Strategic Planning
Dr. Timothy P. Mack, Chair, 2005
Dr. James E. Carpenter, Southeastern Branch Representative, 2003-2005
Dr. Susan J. Weller, Section A Representative, 2003-2005
Dr. Thomas A. Coudron, Section B Representative, 2003-2005
Gail E. Kampmeier, Section C Representative, 2000-2005

Committee on Student Affairs
Rodrigo Krugner, Chair, 2005, and Pacific Branch Representative, 2004-2005
Rebecca L. Loughner, Eastern Branch Representative, 2004-2005
Jeffrey D. Bradshaw, North Central Branch Representative, 2004-2005
Dr. Donny Oswalt, Southeastern Branch Representative, 2004-2005
Douglas B. Jones, Southwestern Branch Representative, 2004-2005

Committee on Systematic Resources
Dr. John D. Oswald, Chair, 2005, and Southwestern Branch Representative, 2004-2005
Dr. Michael E. Schauff, Eastern Branch Representative, 2002-2005
Dr. David A. Rider, North Central Branch Representative, 2005
Dr. Stephen D. Gaimari, Pacific Branch Representative, 2005
Dr. John C. Morse, Southeastern Branch Representative, 2003-2005
Dr. Jason R. Cryan, Secton A Representative, 2005
Dr. David G. Furth, Section A Representative, 2004-2005
Dr. Hugh M. Robertson, Section B Representative, 2004-2005
Dr. Rajainder Kumar, Section C Representative, 2003-2005
Dr. John-Paul Mutebi, Section D Representative, 2004-2005
Dr. John A. Jackman, Section E Representative, 2002-2005
Dr. Joseph E. Funderburk, Section F Representative, 2003-2005
Floyd W. Shockley, Student Liaison, 2005

3.    WHEREAS, the members of the Entomological Society of America who have departed during the year, and whose names were read during the opening plenary session (and appear below), made immeasurable contributions in support of entomology, and
WHEREAS, the Entomological Society of America wishes to acknowledge our loss, and demonstrate our appreciation and recognition of the many accomplishments of our departed members,
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Entomological Society of America recognizes and commends the lifetime achievements of our honored associates.

Dr. Thomas C. Allen, Honorary Member, Corvallis, Oregon
Dr. Felix P. Amerasinghe, Battaramulla, Sri Lanka
Edward W. Baker
Dr. Anthony W.A. Brown, Honorary Member, Vaud, Switzerland
Dr. Raymond C. Bushland, Honorary Member, Kerrville, Texas
Dr. H.C. Chiang, Honorary Member, Ithaca, New York
Dr. Reynold G. Dahms, Fayetteville, Arkansas
Dr. Peter R. Dentener, Auckland, New Zealand
Dr. John C. Downey, Sarasota, Florida
Dr. Edward H. Glass, Honorary Member, Geneva, New York
Dr. Caryl P. Haskins, Guilford, Connecticut
Dr. Rodney Leon Kepner, Fresno, California
Dr. Ray R. Kriner, Mesa, Arizona
Dr. Karl V. Krombein, Washington, DC
Dr. W. Harry Lange, Honorary Member, Davis, California
Dr. George A.H. McClelland, Clio, California
Dr. Daniel S. Moreno, Weslaco, Texas
Dr. Hugo G. Rodeck, Denver, Colorado
Dr. Maurie Semel, BCE (Emeritus), Bucyrus, Ohio
Dr. Martin Sherman, BCE (Emeritus), Honolulu, Hawaii
Dr. John B. Simeone, BCE Retired, Honorary Member, Jamesville, New York
Dr. Clyde F. Smith, Raleigh, North Carolina
Le Grand M. Sparks, Clemson, South Carolina
Charles G. Witherington, BCE Retired, Saint Cloud, Florida

Passed unanimously at the final business meeting of theEntomological Society of America, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, December 18, 2005

1.    WHEREAS, the meeting arrangements, facilities, and services associated with the 2005 Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America have been outstanding, and
WHEREAS, the management and staff of the Greater Fort Lauderdale/Broward County Convention Center, the Fort Lauderdale Marina Marriott as ESA’s headquarters hotel, the Renaissance Fort Lauderdale Hotel, the Embassy Suites Fort Lauderdale, the Fort Lauderdale 17th Street AmeriSuites, and the Comfort Suites Airport and Cruise Port have provided valuable and gracious service,
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Entomological Society of America extends its sincere thanks to these organizations for their contributions to the success of the meeting.

2.     WHEREAS, the scientific program for the 2005 Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America has been intriguing, exciting, and diverse, and
WHEREAS, the task of assembling this outstanding program represents the combined hard work of a number of individuals,
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Program Committee, under the leadership of Program Co-Chairs Susan Weller and Kathleen Shields, the Section Chairs, the 2004 and 2006 Program Chairs, and the Student Liaison to the Program Committee are congratulated and commended for their successful effort.

3.     WHEREAS, the local arrangements for the 2005 Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America have been exceptional,
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Local Arrangements Committee, under the leadership of Catharine Mannion and Nancy Epsky, be thanked for their diligent efforts to the success of the meeting.

4.     WHEREAS, the recording of presentations for the 2005 Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America has been an impressive feat,
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the members of the Technology Committee, under the leadership of Grayson Brown, be praised for their hard work, technological know-how, and dedication in providing this invaluable service on behalf of the Society.

5.    WHEREAS, the 2005 Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America would not have been a success without the support of the sustaining associates, exhibitors and other commercial sponsors, and the many student volunteers.
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Entomological Society of America expresses its sincere gratitude and thanks for their support.

Passed unanimously at the final business meeting of the Entomological Society of America, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, December 18, 2005:

WHEREAS, the members of Subsection Ca of the Entomological Society of America have learned that USDA-APHIS has expanded opportunities for hand-carrying natural enemies and other germplasm, has removed the bonded carrier requirement, and no longer requires shipment to Beltsville, Maryland, for inspection.

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Entomological Society of America and its Subsection Ca recognizes that this is a very positive move forward for biological control and the greater community.

Passed by theEntomological Society of America Governing Board, June 2005 (first passed by the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2002):

"The contemporary theory of biological evolution is one of the most robust products of scientific inquiry. It is the foundation for research in many areas of biology as well as an essential element of science education. To become informed and responsible citizens in our contemporary technological world, students need to study the theories and empirical evidence central to current scientific understanding.

"Over the past several years, proponents of so-called "intelligent design theory," also known as ID, have challenged the accepted scientific theory of biological evolution. As part of this effort they have sought to introduce the teaching of "intelligent design theory" into the science curricula of the public schools. The movement presents "intelligent design theory" to the public as a theoretical innovation, supported by scientific evidence, that offers a more adequate explanation for the origin of the diversity of living organisms than the current scientifically accepted theory of evolution. In response to this effort, individual scientists and philosophers of science have provided substantive critiques of "intelligent design," demonstrating significant conceptual flaws in its formulation, a lack of credible scientific evidence, and misrepresentations of scientific facts.

"Recognizing that the "intelligent design theory" represents a challenge to the quality of science education," the Governing Board of the Entomological Society of America adopts and supports "the Board of Directors of the AAAS" the following resolution:

"WHEREAS, ID proponents claim that contemporary evolutionary theory is incapable of explaining the origin of the diversity of living organisms;
"WHEREAS, to date, the ID movement has failed to offer credible scientific evidence to support their claim that ID undermines the current scientifically accepted theory of evolution;
"WHEREAS, the ID movement has not proposed a scientific means of testing its claims;

"THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the lack of scientific warrant for so-called "intelligent design theory" makes it improper to include as a part of science education;
"THEREFORE BE FURTHER IT RESOLVED, that the Entomological Society of America with AAAS urges citizens across the nation to oppose the establishment of policies that would permit the teaching of "intelligent design theory" as a part of the science curricula of the public schools;
"THEREFORE BE FURTHER IT RESOLVED, that" the Entomological Society of America with "AAAS calls upon its members to assist those engaged in overseeing science education policy to understand the nature of science, the content of contemporary evolutionary theory and the inappropriateness of "intelligent design theory" as subject matter for science education;
"THEREFORE BE FURTHER IT RESOLVED, that" the Entomological Society of America with "AAAS encourages its affiliated societies to endorse this resolution and to communicate their support to appropriate parties at the federal, state and local levels of the government."
 

Passed at the final business meeting of the Entomological Society of America, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, December 18, 2005 (first passed by the Council of Entomology Department Administrators on December 14, 2005):

WHEREAS, entomology, the scientific study of insects and their relatives, aims to increase knowledge of the biology of this largest group of animals on Earth and apply that knowledge toward improving human health and well-being. Advances in entomology depend upon rigorous and widely accepted scientific methods that include the development of hypotheses based on observations that are tested and either falsified or incorporated into the body of knowledge that constitutes the discipline. Any hypothesis that cannot be rejected based on evidence is inherently unscientific.

AND WHEREAS, in all other sciences, the knowledge that accumulates from the testing of various hypotheses can lead to the development of scientific theories, which offer the most comprehensive explanations of natural phenomena and predict the characteristics of as yet unobserved phenomena. Evolution is one of the most robust theories in the biological sciences and has been integral to the conduct of entomological science since it was first articulated some 150 years ago. Indeed, entomologists were among the first North American scientists to incorporate evolutionary theory into their work and have successfully used its explanatory and predictive power to elucidate aspects of the systematics, ecology, physiology, and genetics of insects and their relatives.

AND WHEREAS, no meaningful or significant controversy exists within the biological sciences

AND WHEREAS, in contrast, intelligent design – with its central tenet of irreducible complexity (i.e., aspects of living systems are too complex to ascribe to biological processes and therefore must have been designed by some intelligent force) – is neither predictive nor falsifiable and therefore does not meet the standards of science. Accordingly, intelligent design has no utility in entomology and – for the same reason – has no legitimate place in science classrooms at any level of instruction.

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that for the United States to remain intellectually and economically competitive in the 21st century, its science must be conducted according to time-tested and globally acceptable standards. Evolutionary theory meets those standards and provides the foundation on which the biological sciences can most productively continue to advance. We should expect no less in the quality of science education in this country.

2004 Resolutions

Passed unanimously at the final business meeting of the Entomological Society of America, Salt Lake City, Utah, November 17, 2004

Resolutions Committee: Phil Mulder (Chair)

1.  WHEREAS, the meeting arrangements, facilities, and services associated with the 2004 Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America have been outstanding, and
WHEREAS, the management and staff of the Salt Palace Convention Center, the Marriott Salt Lake City Downtown, the Hilton Salt Lake City Center, and the Shilo Inn have provided exceptional and courteous service,
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Entomological Society of America extends its sincere thanks to these organizations for their contribution to the success of the meeting.

2. WHEREAS, the members of the Entomological Society of America who have departed during the year, and whose names were read during the opening plenary session, made immeasurable contributions in support of entomology, and
WHEREAS, the Entomological Society of America wishes to acknowledge our loss, and demonstrate our appreciation and recognition of the many accomplishments of our departed members,
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Entomological Society of America recognizes and commends the lifetime achievements of our honored associates.

3. WHEREAS, the scientific program for the 2004 Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America has been stimulating, informative, and varied, and
WHEREAS, the task of assembling this outstanding program represents the combined hard work of a number of individuals,
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Program Committee, under the leadership of Program Co-Chairs Rick Weinzierl and Carol Sheppard, the Section Chairs, the 2003 and 2005 Program Chairs, and the Student Liaison to the Program Committee are congratulated and commended for their successful effort.

4. WHEREAS, the local arrangements for the 2004 Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America have been outstanding,
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Local Arrangements Committee, under the leadership of Larry Godfrey and David Haviland, be thanked for their diligent efforts and exemplary contribution to the success of the meeting. BE IT ALSO RESOLVED that the Society recognizes and appreciates the hard work and dedication of Grayson Brown in coordinating the presentation preview room, implementing AM Online on site, and overseeing the audiovisual services necessary for a meeting of this magnitude.

 5. WHEREAS, the 2004 Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America would not have been a success without the support of the sustaining associates, exhibitors and other commercial sponsors, and the many student volunteers.
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Entomological Society of America expresses its sincere appreciation and thanks for their support. ALSO BE IT RESOLVED that the Society expresses it sincere gratitude for the contribution of the complimentary 2005 World of Insects calendar made by Syncroscopy to the attendees of the 2004 annual meeting.

6. WHEREAS, the presidency of Kevin L. Steffey has been marked by exuberance, joviality, and heartfelt dedication towards the current state and future of the Society,
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Entomological Society of America extends its thanks to President Steffey for a job well done.

2003 Resolutions

Passed unanimously at the final business meeting of the Entomological Society of America, Cincinnati, Ohio, October 29, 2003

Resolutions Committee: Gary Hein (Chair)

1. WHEREAS, approximately 2,200 Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) inspectors based at U.S. international ports of entry and other locations within the United States have been transferred to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS); and
WHEREAS, these inspectors are being assigned duties in addition to their former duties related to the interdiction of quarantine pests; and
WHEREAS, the number of quarantine pests intercepted at our ports of entry has been increasing each year in the United States, concomitant with increases in air travel and international trade of agricultural commodities; and
WHEREAS, members of the Entomological Society of America understand the serious threat exotic pests and disease-causing organisms pose for public health and U.S. agriculture;
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Entomological Society of America expresses its concern, urges continued emphasis on the interdiction of quarantine pests by qualified quarantine inspectors, and encourages good communication, cooperation, and mutual support between the DHS and those responsible for quarantine policy and operations within APHIS.

2. WHEREAS, the Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology at Oklahoma State University has had a long and distinguished history of contributions to the advancement of entomology and plant pathology; and
WHEREAS, insects and mites comprise over 75 percent of species biodiversity on Earth, and plant pathogens damage virtually all plant species; and
WHEREAS, entomology and plant pathology have contributed fundamentally to the advancement of the sciences of genetics, ecology, systematics and evolution, animal behavior, modern physiology, biotechnology, animal nutrition, chronobiology, and others; and
WHEREAS, insect and mite pests are responsible for an average of 15 percent of annual pre- and post-harvest agricultural crop losses worldwide and plant pathogens damage all agricultural crops; and
WHEREAS, over 30 percent of all plant productivity on Earth depends on insect pollinators; and
WHEREAS, insect vectors of human and animal diseases such as malaria, Chagas disease, West Nile virus, encephalitis, filariasis, and others affect millions around the world in epidemic proportions; and
WHEREAS, invasive species of insects, mites, and plant pathogens are a constant threat to the stability of agricultural production systems with an average of three new significant invasive species being detected per year nationwide, thus contributing to the need of constant surveillance; and
WHEREAS, such vectors and agricultural pests are potential weapons of bioterrorism in addition to those naturally occurring invasive agents; and
WHEREAS, entomological and pathological research is key for the future of sustainable agriculture and organic farming;
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that we, the entomologists supporting this resolution and expressing the voices of the more-than-5,000 members of the Entomological Society of America, hereby reassert that entomology and plant pathology are indispensable disciplines for the mission of a Land Grant University and appeal to the administration of Oklahoma State University to preserve within the University the integrity of a defined entomology and plant pathology unit capable of fulfilling the needs for research, teaching, and extension that are critical for the state, the region, and the nation.

2002 Resolutions

Passed unanimously at the final business meeting of the Entomological Society of America, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, November 20, 2002

Resolutions Committee: Kathleen Shields (Chair), William Gimpel, Dennis Kopp

1. WHEREAS, the meeting arrangements, facilities, and services associated with the 2002 Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America have been outstanding, and
WHEREAS, the management and staff of the Greater Fort Lauderdale/Broward County Convention Center, the Marina Marriott Hotel, and the Embassy Suites Hotel have provided efficient and courteous service,
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Entomological Society of America extends its sincere thanks to these organizations for their contribution to the success of the meeting.

2. WHEREAS, the members of the Entomological Society of America who have departed during the year, and whose names were read during the opening plenary session, made immeasurable contributions in support of entomology, and
WHEREAS, the Entomological Society of America wishes to acknowledge our loss, and demonstrate our appreciation and recognition of the many accomplishments of our departed members,
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Entomological Society of America recognizes and commends the lifetime achievements of our honored associates.

3. WHEREAS, the scientific program for the 2002 annual meeting of the Entomological Society of America has been stimulating, informative, and varied, and
WHEREAS, the task of assembling this outstanding program represents the combined hard work of a number of individuals,
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Program Committee, under the leadership of Program Chair James H. Shaddy, Section Chairs, and the 2001 and 2003 Program Chairs, are congratulated and commended for their successful effort.

4. WHEREAS, the local arrangements for the 2002 annual meeting of the Entomological Society of America have been outstanding,
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Local Arrangements Committee, under the leadership of Jackie Miller and Bob McPherson, be thanked for their diligent efforts and outstanding contribution to the success of the meeting.

5. WHEREAS, the 2002 annual meeting of the Entomological Society of America would not have been a success without the unselfish support of the faculty, staff, and students of the University of Florida, the support of the sustaining associates, exhibitors and other commercial sponsors, and the many student volunteers,
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Entomological Society of America expresses its sincere appreciation and thanks for their support.

6. WHEREAS, the presidency of J.E. McPherson has been marked by enthusiasm and vision, and by diligent attention to a myriad of challenges,
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Entomological Society of America extends its thanks to President McPherson for a job well done.

7. WHEREAS, the Entomological Society of America recognizes the primary role of the National Science Foundation (NSF) in the funding of research in insect systematics in the United States, and
WHEREAS, the need for work in insect systematics has been identified as a critical issue for scientists and managers in agriculture, ecology, behavior, conservation, biodiversity and many basic sciences, and
WHEREAS, the Entomological Society of America is strongly supportive of the current funding of insect systematics by NSF programs through the systematics, biological research collections and biodiversity surveys and inventories programs.
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Entomological Society of America strongly commends the National Science Foundation for the creation of the new programs of planetary biodiversity inventories, revisionary syntheses in systematics and assembling the tree of life, and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Entomological Society of America supports the continued growth of all of these programs in support of scientific discovery in the field of systematics.

8. WHEREAS, insects and mites comprise over 75 percent of the species diversity on Earth, and
WHEREAS, entomology has contributed fundamentally to the advancement of the sciences of genetics, ecology, systematics and evolution, animal behavior, modern physiology, animal nutrition, chronobiology, and others, and
WHEREAS, insect and mite pests are responsible for an average of 15 percent of annual pre-and post-harvest agricultural crop losses worldwide, and
WHEREAS, over 30 percent of all plant productivity on Earth depends on insect pollinators, and
WHEREAS, insect vectors of human and animal diseases such as malaria, Chagas disease, West Nile virus, encephalitis, filariasis, and others affect millions around the world in epidemic proportions, and
WHEREAS, invasive species of insects and mites are a constant threat to the stability of agricultural production systems, with, on average, three new significant invasive species being detected per year in the United States, contributing to the need for constant surveillance, and
WHEREAS, such vectors and agricultural pests are potential weapons of bioterrorism in addition to those naturally occurring invasive agents, and
WHEREAS, entomological research is key for the future of sustainable agriculture and organic farming, and
WHEREAS, the Department of Entomology at Oregon State University has had a long and distinguished history of contributions to the advancement of entomology,
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the 6,000 members of the Entomological Society of America hereby reassert that entomology is an indispensable discipline for the mission of a Land Grant University and appeal to the administration of Oregon State University to preserve within the University the integrity of a defined entomological unit capable of fulfilling the needs for research, teaching, and extension that are critical for the state, region and nation.

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