Pre-Conference Workshops

The North Central Branch Program Committee is pleased to offer two pre-conference workshops for attendees with the generous support of our sponsors: Bartlett Tree Experts and Davey Tree Expert Company.

Advance registration is required. Register online

Ground Beetle Ecology and Identification Workshop
Multivariate Experimental Design and Data Analysis for Entomology Research

Ground Beetle Ecology and Identification Workshop

Dates: Friday, March 18 - Sunday, March 20
Time: Friday, March 19 8-5, Saturday 8-5, to Sunday 8-2
Cost: $300 - this includes lunch and snacks (Friday to Sunday) and dinner on Saturday, as well as transportation to and from the conference hotel to the workshop site

Workshop Summary: Do you want to learn how to identify ground beetles? Are you interested in working with Carabidae for your research? Or do you have vials of Carabidae, but need help with species identification? If so, the ground beetle identification workshop is for you!

Ground beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae) are a diverse, widely distributed insect family with over 40,000 species throughout the world. Members of this beetle family are abundant and found across diverse natural and managed ecosystems. Many species are predatory and feed on a variety of invertebrate prey, including slugs, snails, earthworms, and insects. Some species also feed on plant seeds. Moreover, ground beetles are commonly considered indicators of environmental change, making this family a common focal group for ecological research.

This 3-day workshop will provide a general overview of ground beetle identification and natural history, with a focus on North American taxa. The workshop will consist of lectures and laboratory identifications. Emphasis will be placed on the use of dichotomous keys and the characters needed for species identification. Keys, diagrams, and other resources will be provided. Participants are highly encouraged to bring their own research specimens to the workshop for identification!

Workshop Instructor: Dr. Kayla I Perry is a Postdoctoral Research Associate at Kent State University. Her research interests focus on understanding how natural and anthropogenic disturbances influence the structure and function of insect communities in natural and managed ecosystems. She graduated with her Ph.D. in Entomology in 2016 from the Ohio State University where she investigated the responses of ground-dwelling arthropod communities to disturbance caused by emerald ash borer, windstorms, and salvage logging in forest ecosystems. Kayla’s postdoctoral research has focused on understanding processes of insect community assembly in highly altered landscapes such as urban ecosystems with the goal of improving biodiversity conservation. Kayla specializes on beetles and has used species in the families Carabidae, Scarabaeidae, Geotrupidae, Silphidae, and Staphylinidae as indicators in her research. With 10 years of experience working with Carabidae in a variety of ecosystems, Kayla is excited to share her knowledge and love of this family with others. To learn more about Kayla’s research, check out her interview on Entomology Today

Have questions about the workshop? Contact Dr. Perry for more information.


Multivariate Experimental Design and Data Analysis for Entomology Research

Dates: Friday, March 18 - Sunday, March 20
Time: Friday 8-5, Saturday 8-5, to Sunday 8-2
Cost: $300 - this includes lunch and snacks (Friday to Sunday) and dinner on Saturday, as well as transportation to and from the conference hotel to the workshop site

Workshop Summary: The study of entomology and other biological sciences increasingly relies on complex experimental and observational studies that leverage new statistical tools and modeling techniques. Experimental designs and observational studies also often require analysis of large, complex, multi-variate datasets. In this workshop, we will cover aspects of multivariate experimental design and data analysis. Participants will be given case studies to assist them with analyses and interpretation of both simple and complex studies typical of the entomological sciences. We will also encourage students to bring their own datasets to work with as part of the workshop. Participants will be trained both in statistical methodology as well as R statistical software.

Workshop Instructor: Dr. Dave Crowder is an Associate Professor of Entomology at Washington State University. He graduated with a BS/MS from the University of Illinois and a PhD from the University of Arizona. His laboratory has 8 graduate students and 4 postdoctoral scholars who work on sustainable agriculture, plant-insect interactions, and insect ecology. Crowder teaches a course on experimental design and statistics in R for graduate students at WSU.

Have questions about the workshop? Contact Dr. Crowder for more information.

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